Tuesday, February 9, 2016

#ChSocM: Helping Your Online Ministry Take Off

The Topic: Helping Your Online Ministry Take Off
Whether you are just starting are been at this for years, we are talking about moving to the next level

This week's (02/09/16) chat moderated by David Hansen (@rev_david) 

Topics:
T1: What are you most excited about in your online ministry this Lent?
T2: What 1 piece of advice would you give to someone just starting on #chsocm?
T3: What is the advice that you need to give yourself? The thing that you aren't doing that would make your #chsocm better?
T4: What is BEST thing you've done to improve your #chsocm ministry in the last year?
T5: Besides this chat (naturally), where do you turn to learn new things about #chsocm?
T6: What ONE THING can you do this Lent to make your #chsocm ministry better?


Read the transcript on Storify


















Tuesday, February 2, 2016

#ChSocM: Policy

The Topic: #ChSocM Policy
How to create one

This week's (02/02/16) chat moderated by Neal F. Fischer (@nealffischer) 

Topics:
T1: Should we treat #ChSocM platforms differently? Explain your answer.
T2: Who should initiate connections on #ChSocM platforms?
T2a: Are there any #ChSocM connections to avoid?
T3: What types of #ChSocM conversations should happen privately?
T3a: What types of #ChSocM conversations should NOT happen privately?
T4: What types of images are okay to post on your #ChSocM outlets?
T5: When is it appropriate to delete a #ChSocM post?
T6: What privacy settings will we use on our #ChSocM outlets?



Read the transcript on Storify

















Wednesday, January 27, 2016

#ChSocM: Storytelling and Storytellers

The Topic: Storytelling and Storytellers
Not just story telling, but story sharing! 

This week's (01/26/16) chat moderated by Amy Rork (@azrork)

Topics:
T1: Do social media users have the patience for storytelling?
T2: Faith-based or secular, do you have any favorite social media storytellers?
T3: What can you learn from your favorites that translates to your own storytelling?
T4: What SM platforms help you tell your (or your org’s) story?
T5: Are there other or new SM platforms you’d like to explore for telling your story?
T6: We've heard a few mention this -- anyone else want to share a personal storytelling success story? Either for you or your org?


Read the transcript on Storify
















Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Flipping Your Conference...Talk/Panel/Workshop

Note: Originally posted on August 27, 2014 to the Mayo Clinic Social Media Network blog. Slightly edited and reposted here so it's out from behind a paywall. Yes, written for healthcare folks but easy to extrapolate for use in the world of church conferences. 
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Presenting at a conference? Even if it's sooner than soon, thanks to social media you still have time to generate more engagement by "flipping" your talk or panel presentation or workshop or poster session.

I've known about this tactic for a while, but have become even more convinced of its value beyond the classroom after seeing what happened when Pam Ressler (@PamRessler), Susannah Fox (@SusannahFox), Colleen Young (@Colleen_Young) and I started using it two months before our Stanford Medicine X conference panel (Communicating the Experience of Illness in the Digital Age).

Here, I'll describe what's involved and offer practical tips for... flipping!

Flipping Origins
FlippedClassroomUWcolors.EDITED

Flipped teaching or what's sometimes called the "flipped classroom," emerged over a decade ago as a corrective to the traditional and inherently passive lecture format.

Flipped teaching requires student engagement with material before showing up for class. Actual class contact time is then focused on discussing and processing material. (For a detailed introduction to this technique, see: Flipping the Classroom.)

Flipping the Panel
"Flipping the panel," which involves engaging conference attendees before their arrival, benefits presenters as well as participants.

Trotting out background information in advance increases the probability of generating an educated audience. Sharing a conceptual framework in advance allows observers to provide input that, in turn, gives presenters an opportunity to rethink and revise the presentation.

Online social networking platforms makes flipping the panel easy and swift, while extending active participation beyond the conference's physical space and time. As ever, start by thinking strategically about this tactic by asking:
  • Who is my audience?
  • Where online will I find my audience?
  • What do I want my audience to learn/know/do?
  • What message(s) will help me accomplish my goal(s)?
Investing a bit of time thinking through these questions will make it easy to choose social networking tools.

Practical Tips For Using Social Networking PlatformsTo enhance our panel presentation, my panel-mates and I used the following social media tools in the following ways:
  • Blogs: We used our blogs to rollout information about the panel itself, flipping the panel, and what each of us would address. Our blog posts included a strong CTA (call to action) viz., an invitation for readers to comment on the post itself as well as via other social media. We cross-posted on one another's blogs and tweeted links.
  • Twitter: We continued blog post conversations during two Twitter-based chats: 1) #hcsmca, Health Care and Social Media Canada, founded by Colleen Young, who moderated that day's chat;  and 2) #hpm (Hospice and Palliative Medicine, founded by MCCSM External Advisory Board member, Christian Sinclair and moderated for this chat by Pam Ressler).This has helped us predict which issues will emerge during the real-time Q&A period. We also RT'd (re-tweeted) to advance the educational/conceptual points we want to make and to generate awareness about our panel. (For a meta-level example of this tactic, see: "One person's TMI is another person's need-to-know" post by Susannah Fox.)
  • Storify: Susannah Fox, whose Storify use is always brilliant, set it up to provide resources, capture tweets, link to transcripts on Symplur, and enhance the conversation with images. (For the Storify transcript, see: Communicating the experience of illness in the digital age, noting where Susannah added interlinear notes.)
While using any single one of these platforms would probably have been effective, taking an integrated tactical approach makes more sense. Different tools will appeal to and be used differently by different sectors of your audience (e.g., lengthy blog comments v. tweets).

So, what do you think? Have I persuaded you to flip your next event? Have you already given this tactic a try? If so, what worked, what didn't, and what could have worked better?

Image: Source

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

#CHSOCM: Hosting your own #chsocm conference

The Topic: Hosting Your Own #CHSOCM Conference
What would your conference look like? 

This week's (01/19/16) chat moderated by Neal F. Fischer (@nealffischer)

Topics:
T1. What would you want to learn at a conference?
T1a. You’re the organizer, how do you figure out what your attendees want to learn?
T2. Who are the presenters you’d want to have to cover the previously mentioned subjects?
T3: What are some resources available to you that would help defray some of the costs of a conference?
T4. What are some ways to have presenters able to interact and present without being in the room?
T5 What are some of the tools you are using as communicators to get the job done? (anything you find helpful)
T6. Finally, Where do you go from here? How do you keep up the relationships and momentum?


Read the transcript on Storify















Tuesday, January 12, 2016

#CHSOCM: The Psychology of Social Media (and how to use it better)

The Topic: The Psychology of Social Media (and how to use it better)
We’re going to look at some research findings and what that might mean for the way we use #chsocm

This week's (01/12/16) chat moderated by Carolyn Clement (@singingcarolyn)

Topics:
T1: What does the importance of images to our psyche mean for our use of #chsocm?
T2: Content that arouses strong emotions (good or bad) is more likely to be shared. Comments? #chsocm?
T3: We use social media to reveal and share our best selves. What does that mean for our use of #chsocm?
T4: How can we use #chsocm to help meet peoples' need for connection?
T5: How can we use #chsocm tools to help others feel that they belong, & find meaning?
T6: How can we leverage nostalgia in our #chsocm posts to make life more warm and fuzzy?
EXTRA: Anyone have anything else they’d like to share? Any of those great posts from your homework? #chsocm


Read the transcript on Storify